Point Lookout: a free weekly publication of Chaco Canyon Consulting
Volume 3, Issue 12;   March 19, 2003: Games for Meetings: Part III

Games for Meetings: Part III

by

We spend a lot of time and emotional energy in meetings, much of it engaged in any of dozens of ritualized games. Here's Part III of a little catalog of some of our favorites, and what we could do about them.
A late rabbit

When we complain that meetings are boring, time-wasting, maddening, or frustrating, it might help to check first about the roles we play ourselves. There are dozens of tactics and ploys, which I've been collecting over the years. Here's the third installment of a little catalog of the more common ones. See "Games for Meetings: Part II," Point Lookout for February 19, 2003, and "Games for Meetings: Part IV," Point Lookout for April 16, 2003, for more.

Rewriting History
Let's recast this enterprise-scale disaster into a near-miraculous feat of strategic planning.
When we all want to see things from a particular perspective, we sometimes re-enforce each other. We support each other in denying the obvious. And smart people are especially vulnerable, because they can create more elaborately plausible pseudo-explanations. If your team has these tendencies, invite one or two observers. Their mere presence can be a deterrent.
Piling On
Someone is declared "it," and many of us attack. Much more interesting if designee is actually present.
When several people attack another, they can cause permanent damage to the team, because afterwards, everyone knows that anyone can be a target. When an attack occurs, the chair is in the best position to intervene immediately to end it, adjourning the meeting if necessary, to deal privately with the problem of piling on. If you're present when an attack occurs, and the chair doesn't intervene, either raise the issue, or object, or excuse yourself from the room.
I'm Finally Here
I always arrive late, proving my importance.
Late arrivals, at best, disrupt the flow of the meeting, and might even delay its start. Tolerating this pattern is an expensive habit. If many people are often late, it's possible that everyone is overloaded, or that the pattern is so well-established that it doesn't pay to arrive on time. Whatever the case, this problem is one that management is best able to address.
I'm Rarely Here
I'm too important for this, but please schedule these meetings to fit my downtime in case I can make it.
Making allowances for someone who rarely shows up degrades the importance of the effort and demoralizes the team. Schedule the meeting for the convenience of the people who attend it.
Approving the Minutes
We always approve the minutes, no matter what they don't say.
Minutes are useful as records of what was decided and why. An organization in which people are afraid to write down this information eventually pays a high price — it cannot learn from its mistakes.
Cellular Escape
Have someone (or some device) page you.
Tricky, tricky. This one used to work, maybe in 1999. No longer — now people who excuse themselves this way have been heard to exclaim, "It's real! Honest!"

Which of these do you do? Which can you stop doing? What can you do instead? Keep track of what you see in your meetings, and talk about their costs. More coming in future issues — send me descriptions of your more delightful discoveries. Go to top Top  Next issue: There Is No Rumor Mill  Next Issue

For more on telephonic deceptions, see "Telephonic Deceptions: Part I," Point Lookout for September 14, 2011.

101 Tips for Effective MeetingsDo you spend your days scurrying from meeting to meeting? Do you ever wonder if all these meetings are really necessary? (They aren't) Or whether there isn't some better way to get this work done? (There is) Read 101 Tips for Effective Meetings to learn how to make meetings much more productive and less stressful — and a lot more rare. Order Now!

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