Point Lookout: a free weekly publication of Chaco Canyon Consulting
Volume 5, Issue 32;   August 10, 2005: Bonuses

Bonuses

by

How we deal with adversity can make the difference between happiness and something else. And how we deal with adversity depends on how we see it.
Wheelchair basketball

Retired Senior Airman Ryan Gallo makes a pass during the Air Force wheelchair basketball game against the Navy at the 2014 Warrior Games Sept. 29, 2014, at the United States Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The Air Force team lost 38-19 and would go on to play Special Operations in the next round. Photo courtesy U.S Air Force by Staff Sgt. Devon Suits.

Near the end of his life, my Dad endured many of the maladies of old age — and steadily progressing Multiple Sclerosis. He didn't talk much about it, except when someone said, "Hi, how are you?" which was pretty often, because that's how we say hello around here.

He had many stock answers for "Hi, how are you." One was, "Some days good, other days (pause) better!" He would deliver this line with perfect timing and an infectious smile, and when the laugh came, he'd join in.

Another favorite answer of his for "Hi how are you" was, "Well, that depends…how much time do you have?" Always with the infectious smile.

He never kept track of who'd heard which line before. But even if you'd heard a line dozens of times, his smile made it impossible not to laugh.

He had a name for his afflictions — the debilitating arthritis, the muscles that no longer worked, the phantom pains, and so on. He called them "bonuses." When I first heard him describe his arthritis as a "bonus," I got curious.

Me: Dad. Why do you call the arthritis a 'bonus?' What do you mean by 'bonus?'

Dad: Well, son, I'm glad you asked…

Me (not aloud, of course): Uh-oh.

Dad (continuing): A bonus is something you didn't ask for, something extra, something you can live without. (pause)

Me: Yeah…

Dad: And this arthritis, I can definitely live without.

Ba-dum-bum.

Bonuses are
part of Life
Bonuses are part of Life. How we deal with them makes the difference between a happy life and something else. Here are some thoughts about dealing with bonuses.

Humor helps
I don't think my Dad was "naturally" funny. He led a difficult life, filled with bonuses, and he learned somehow along the way that humor helped. He learned how to be funny.
You can be funny, too. It's a skill, like jumping rope, or adding numbers, or burning toast. I'm really great at burning toast.
Happiness is an often-overlooked choice
Whenever you receive a bonus, you can think about it in different ways. The choice you make affects your happiness.
Choosing a perspective that makes you even a little bit happy might be difficult — it might require a bit of creativity. Fortunately creativity comes with being Human.
Your choices affect the people around you
When you choose how to deal with a bonus, your choice affects the people around you, especially the people you love.
Hiding your suffering doesn't work — the misery leaks out eventually. Wallowing in it doesn't work either. Choosing to be as happy as you can be is a good middle path.

Whenever I receive a bonus, I eventually remember that it's an opportunity to practice dealing with bonuses. Even though I still have a lot to learn, I'm getting better at it, because long ago I received a bonus in the more conventional sense — in the form of my Dad. Maybe you received a bonus too. Go to top Top  Next issue: Controlling Condescension  Next Issue

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