Point Lookout: a free weekly publication of Chaco Canyon Consulting
Volume 7, Issue 29;   July 18, 2007: Reverse Micromanagement

Reverse Micromanagement

by

Micromanagement is too familiar to too many of us. Less familiar is inappropriate interference in the reverse direction — in the work of our supervisors or even higher in the chain. Disciplinary action isn't always helpful, especially when some of the causes of reverse micromanagement are organizational.

Micromanagement is inappropriate interference in the work of subordinates by supervisors. Most of us are familiar with it, because it's so painful and memorable. Other forms of inappropriate interference are less familiar, perhaps because they happen less often, and because the target of the interference often does have power to respond.

The USS Doyle as DMS-34, when she played The Caine

The USS Doyle as DMS-34. It was as this designation that she played the Caine in the film version of The Caine Mutiny. The story turns around a commander who displayed many faults, one of which was a tendency to micromanage. The mutiny in the story can be seen as reverse micromanagement. Photo courtesy NavSource.

Another form of inappropriate interference is reverse micromanagement — interference by subordinates in the work of their organizational superiors. Examples include openly questioning decisions or policies, confrontation, willful disobedience, organizational coups d'etat, or covert insubordination.

Usually, we blame the reverse micromanagers. We advise them to mind their own jobs, or we initiate (or threaten them with) "corrective action plans." Sometimes, the subordinate's own behavior is the sole cause, and these actions do work.

But when there are other causes, focusing on the reverse micromanager probably isn't the answer. And then, even termination won't help, because the other causes remain in place to help create new reverse micromanagers.

Here are some examples of causes that reside beyond the reverse micromanager.

Failure to lead
When management's decisions don't make sense to the managed, they often question those decisions, sometimes aloud. Perhaps the decisions are flawed, but often, management simply hasn't worked hard enough to bring about the needed level of understanding.
Some managers believe that employees should just do what they're told, and that management isn't obliged to lead — an approach that worked better 100 years ago. In today's knowledge-driven organizations, only true leadership works.
Effective leadership — headlong over a cliff
When management's decisions
don't make sense to the
managed, they often question
those decisions, sometimes aloud
Sometimes management's decisions are mistaken, and some of the people of the organization know they are. When this happens, some feel the need to question these decisions or otherwise try to put them right. The urge is especially strong if the organization is in a weakened state, or if management has made missteps before.
Reverse micromanagement in these cases is a gift not to be refused. Still, since it can create difficulty by threatening organizational order, it's best to seek ways to channel these contributions to make them formally acceptable. More important, determine and remove the cause(s) of the missteps.
Inadequate growth opportunities
In today's flat, contractor-staffed organizations, the able find too little opportunity for career growth. Some stay in positions they've long ago outgrown. These valuable employees are lost to the organization — a loss that was somehow not accounted for when we flattened the hierarchy or decided to outsource.
People in these circumstances can become cynical sources of trouble. Find ways to give them paths to success. They're too valuable to let go.

If you're ever micromanaged, you might feel the urge to do something to get your manager to stop micromanaging. Overcome the urge — it's a form of reverse micromanagement. Go to top Top  Next issue: My Boss Gabs Too Much  Next Issue

Micromanagement and reverse micromanagement are just two forms of inappropriate interference in the work of others. Two more are lateral micromanagement and diagonal micromanagement — topics for another time.

For more about micromanagement, see "When Your Boss Is a Micromanager," Point Lookout for December 5, 2001; "There Are No Micromanagers," Point Lookout for January 7, 2004; "Are You Micromanaging Yourself?," Point Lookout for November 24, 2004; and "How to Tell If You Work for a Nanomanager," Point Lookout for March 7, 2007.

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