Point Lookout: a free weekly publication of Chaco Canyon Consulting
Volume 13, Issue 44;   October 30, 2013: Twelve Tips for More Masterful Virtual Presentations: I

Twelve Tips for More Masterful Virtual Presentations: I

by

Virtual presentations are like face-to-face presentations, in that one (or a few) people present a program to an audience. But the similarity ends there. In the virtual environment, we have to adapt if we want to deliver a message effectively. We must learn to be captivating.
A daffodil

A daffodil. Amazingly, daffodils and humans share significant amounts of DNA. In some respects, nearly all species on Earth are elaborations on a single big idea — cell-based life forms using DNA to pass instructions from generation to generation. Photo courtesy U.S. National Park Service.

The differences between virtual presentations and face-to-face presentations have such dramatic psychological implications that presenters accustomed to face-to-face presenting are sometimes disappointingly ineffective. To be effective in the virtual environment they must reset their expectations and alter their practices and behavior, both technically and psychologically. The goal is audience engagement. The strategy is to gain and keep audience attention.

Here's Part I of a collection of tips for achieving audience engagement in the virtual environment.

Deliver just one big idea
Virtual presenters are competing with the goings-on in the audience members' environments. The audience is weeks behind on everything, and flooded with stimuli. They can't handle seven, five, or even three big ideas. Pick one. Develop it fully.
Having too many big ideas causes audience multitasking — not good if you want 100% of their attention. If you have three big ideas, make three presentations. Deliver them one after another with big breaks in between, or on three consecutive days, or make them available for viewing on demand.
But "one big idea" doesn't mean "one idea." Include smaller ideas within that big idea, if they fit snugly together.
Keep it short
Brevity is easy if you have just one big idea. Presenting for more than 20 minutes in a virtual environment, using only voice and possibly slides, risks audience boredom. When they start checking their inboxes or voicemail, or tweeting, you've lost them.
Get to the point
Suspense is your enemy. Deliver the headline first. When the audience can't tell where you're going, they start multitasking. After the audience has the headline, only then can they receive supporting and motivating information.
Use videos to add interest
Still photos are Virtual presenters are competing
with the goings-on in the
audience members' environments
OK. Videos are better. A two-minute video every 7 or 10 minutes is about right, if it's relevant and well-produced. Fluffy or amateurish video causes multitasking.
Break it into three- to five-minute bites
Think of being interviewed. The interviewer poses questions. You deliver crisp, full replies, with at least one "sound bite." A few of those and a wrap-up make a presentation. Segments must be small because a 15- or 20-minute story can't compete with email clients or smartphones that beep, chirp, or play swatches of pop tunes whenever new messages arrive. If you're recording for a podcast, this short-bite structure lets audience members pause if they must, resuming when they're able.
Stand, don't sit
It's tempting to present while seated, but standing elevates your energy level, and you're more likely to be captivating. Standing for a long time can be uncomfortable — yet another reason to keep it short.

OK, I'm guessing that you have other things to do right now. I'll be back next week with more on this. Next in this series  Go to top Top  Next issue: Twelve Tips for More Masterful Virtual Presentations: II  Next Issue

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The Power Affect: How We Express Our Personal Power
Many The Power Affect: How We Express Personal Powerpeople who possess real organizational power have a characteristic demeanor. It's the way they project their presence. I call this the power affect. Some people — call them power pretenders — adopt the power affect well before they attain significant organizational power. Unfortunately for their colleagues, and for their organizations, power pretenders can attain organizational power out of proportion to their merit or abilities. Understanding the power affect is therefore important for anyone who aims to attain power, or anyone who works with power pretenders. Read more about this program.

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