Point Lookout: a free weekly publication of Chaco Canyon Consulting
Volume 8, Issue 5;   January 30, 2008: The True Costs of Cost-Cutting

The True Costs of Cost-Cutting

by

Last updated: August 8, 2018

The metaphor "trimming the fat" rests on the belief that some parts of the organization are expendable, and we can remove them with little impact on the remainder. Ah, if only things actually worked that way...
A recently reclaimed property near Buffalo, New York

A recently reclaimed, formerly vacant, property near Buffalo, New York. Offshoring and outsourcing tend to produce local surplus property, which often remains unused for extended periods. Reductions have fairly obvious effects on the organizations that undergo the reductions, but even thriving neighbors can feel the effects. Vacant or abandoned properties surrounding the facilities of otherwise healthy firms can be depressing to look at, and the long-term effects of such sights can depress productivity. When these effects are considered, it can make economic sense for healthy firms in such circumstances to develop neighboring properties, lest those healthy firms themselves become less healthy. Photo courtesy National Vacant Properties Campaign.

When organizations cut costs, decision makers often assume that the parts of the organizations that remain after the cuts can continue to produce at pre-reduction levels. They rarely do. For example, downsizing the Purchasing function can have ripple effects throughout the organization. And canceling one project can actually affect other projects even if they don't depend on the canceled project.

Fundamentally, organizations are systems. Moreover, they don't "factorize" easily — their parts are interconnected in ways that are outside our awareness. These interconnections sometimes propagate the effects of cost cutting. We tend not to notice these channels, in part, because they don't correspond to connections in the org chart or line items in the Chart of Accounts.

Unexpected propagation happens because the effects of cost cutting tend to travel not only along formal lines, but also along personal lines — that is, the relationships between people, and the perceptions and emotions of everyone in the organization, including the people who we believe ought to be "unaffected" by the changes.

Here are some examples of how the effects of cost cutting propagate. If your job entails estimating how much time or effort tasks require, and if your organization is in the midst of reductions, you'll do a little better if you take these effects into account.

Personal network disruption
Waves of reductions in force tend to disrupt the networks people use to find out how to do things — how to prepare requisitions, which procedures to follow, or where to find the answers to burning questions. Relocations and site consolidations have similar effects.
Change-driven chaos
The effects of cost cutting
tend to propagate along
personal lines — perceptions,
emotions and the relationships
between people
The entire organization can descend into change-driven chaos. People become distracted and performance degrades, especially when procedures and job responsibilities change rapidly. Many begin working for new supervisors, with whom they must establish new relationships. Some find themselves working for supervisors with whom they might have unpleasant history.
Termination-induced grief
When groups of friends are separated because some have been terminated, the survivors enter a period of grieving, sometimes called "survivor's guilt." Their productivity can degrade significantly.
Voluntary turnover
When things get sour, people begin to fear they will be targeted next. Those with alternatives elsewhere (usually the most talented) start job searches preemptively. Vesting schedules for stock options, profit sharing, and pension plans lose their ability to hold people, because of skepticism about the value of the underlying benefit.
The what's-the-point effect
People who notice ways to reduce costs, and people who would otherwise either contribute innovations or prevent catastrophes, start to ask, "What's the point?" They begin to feel that they won't be rewarded for their trouble, or that they might be terminated before being rewarded with the next merit pay increases, which have often been suspended anyway.

If you're weighing a decision to cut costs, estimating the full impact of these effects might improve the quality of your decision. And remember that personal network disruption, chaos, survivor's guilt, and the rest, might affect you, too. When that happens, it can degrade your ability to notice these effects. Is it already happening? Go to top Top  Next issue: Communication Templates: I  Next Issue

52 Tips for Leaders of Project-Oriented OrganizationsAre your projects always (or almost always) late and over budget? Are your project teams plagued by turnover, burnout, and high defect rates? Turn your culture around. Read 52 Tips for Leaders of Project-Oriented Organizations, filled with tips and techniques for organizational leaders. Order Now!

Your comments are welcome

Would you like to see your comments posted here? rbrenlDAgupDmSFryJOxMner@ChacVLSvwdTyKYURskXeoCanyon.comSend me your comments by email, or by Web form.

About Point Lookout

Thank you for reading this article. I hope you enjoyed it and found it useful, and that you'll consider recommending it to a friend.

Point Lookout is a free weekly email newsletter. Browse the archive of past issues. Subscribe for free.

Support Point Lookout by joining the Friends of Point Lookout, as an individual or as an organization.

Do you face a complex interpersonal situation? Send it in, anonymously if you like, and I'll give you my two cents.

Related articles

More articles on Organizational Change:

Steppingstones in PompeiiChange How You Change
In the past two years, your life has probably changed. Do you commute over the same route you did two years ago? Same transportation? Same job? Same company? Same industry? Change is all around, and you're probably pretty skilled at it. You can become even more skilled if you change how you change.
Masks of Tragedy and ComedyThe Ties that Bind
Changing anything in an organization reveals how it's connected to its people, to its processes, to its facilities, and to the overall context. Usually, these connections reach out much further into the organization than we imagine.
Winter dawn in BostonOn Beginnings
A new year has begun, and I'm contemplating beginnings. Beginnings can inspire, and sometimes lead to letdown when our hopes or expectations aren't met. How can we handle beginnings more powerfully?
Erecting a floating bridge in Korea (1952)When Change Is Hard: II
When organizational change is difficult, we sometimes blame poor leadership or "resistance." But even when we believe we have good leadership and the most cooperative populations, we can still encounter trouble. Why is change so hard so often?
Demolished vehicles line Highway 80, also known as the "Highway of Death"Reactance and Micromanagement
When we feel that our freedom at work is threatened, we sometimes experience urges to do what is forbidden, or to not do what is required. This phenomenon — called reactance — might explain some of the dynamics of micromanagement.

See also Organizational Change and Project Management for more related articles.

Forthcoming issues of Point Lookout

The road to Cottonwood Pass, ColoradoComing April 24: Big, Complicated Problems
Big, complicated problems can be difficult to solve. Even contemplating them can be daunting. But we can survive them if we get advice we can trust, know our resources, recall solutions to past problems, find workarounds, or as a last resort, escape. Available here and by RSS on April 24.
Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD)And on May 1: Full Disclosure
The term "full disclosure" is now a fairly common phrase, especially in news interviews and in film and fiction thrillers involving government employees or attorneys. It also has relevance in the knowledge workplace, and nuances associated with it can affect your credibility. Available here and by RSS on May 1.

Coaching services

I offer email and telephone coaching at both corporate and individual rates. Contact Rick for details at rbrenJskhxkboLyqvZTviner@ChacSyevWWGAzTpwOPoUoCanyon.com or (650) 787-6475, or toll-free in the continental US at (866) 378-5470.

Get the ebook!

Past issues of Point Lookout are available in six ebooks:

Reprinting this article

Are you a writer, editor or publisher on deadline? Are you looking for an article that will get people talking and get compliments flying your way? You can have 500 words in your inbox in one hour. License any article from this Web site. More info

Public seminars

The Power Affect: How We Express Our Personal Power
Many The Power Affect: How We Express Personal Powerpeople who possess real organizational power have a characteristic demeanor. It's the way they project their presence. I call this the power affect. Some people — call them power pretenders — adopt the power affect well before they attain significant organizational power. Unfortunately for their colleagues, and for their organizations, power pretenders can attain organizational power out of proportion to their merit or abilities. Understanding the power affect is therefore important for anyone who aims to attain power, or anyone who works with power pretenders. Read more about this program.

Follow Rick

Send email or subscribe to one of my newsletters Follow me at LinkedIn Follow me at Twitter, or share a tweet Subscribe to RSS feeds Subscribe to RSS feeds
The message of Point Lookout is unique. Help get the message out. Please donate to help keep Point Lookout available for free to everyone.
Technical Debt for Policymakers BlogMy blog, Technical Debt for Policymakers, offers resources, insights, and conversations of interest to policymakers who are concerned with managing technical debt within their organizations. Get the millstone of technical debt off the neck of your organization!
Go For It: Sometimes It's Easier If You RunBad boss, long commute, troubling ethical questions, hateful colleague? Learn what we can do when we love the work but not the job.
303 Tips for Virtual and Global TeamsLearn how to make your virtual global team sing.
101 Tips for Managing ChangeAre you managing a change effort that faces rampant cynicism, passive non-cooperation, or maybe even outright revolt?
101 Tips for Effective MeetingsLearn how to make meetings more productive — and more rare.
Exchange your "personal trade secrets" — the tips, tricks and techniques that make you an ace — with other aces, anonymously. Visit the Library of Personal Trade Secrets.