Point Lookout: a free weekly publication of Chaco Canyon Consulting
Volume 7, Issue 1;   January 3, 2007: Excuses, Excuses

Excuses, Excuses

by

Last updated: August 8, 2018

When a goal remains unaccomplished, we sometimes tell ourselves that we understand why. And sometimes we do. But at other times, we're just fooling ourselves.
The U.S. Capitol at night

The U.S. Capitol at night. On December 10, 2006, the 109th U.S. Congress adjourned without completing work on 9 of the 11 bills needed to appropriate funds for the fiscal year that began the previous Oct 1.

Photo courtesy U.S. House Democratic Cloakroom.

Sometimes we have objectives that elude us over a long period of time. When this happens, we usually remain unaware of the situation, until by "happenstance" the question arises: "Why haven't I accomplished that?" Here are some of the "answers" that enable continuation of the status quo.

  • Something came up and I put everything else on hold.
  • I made progress, but then I came to where I didn't know what to do.
  • I came to where I had to make a choice, and I couldn't make up my mind.
  • I came to where I had to make a choice, and I chose another path, which now seems to be a mistake, but I can't fix it right now.
  • I can see how to get something like what I want, but it isn't exactly right, so I'm waiting.
  • I found something really interesting to do, and that got me off track, but I'm back now.
  • I've had a lot on my plate, but I plan to get moving now.
  • I have a lot on my plate right now, but I plan to get moving soon.
  • I think I'll be having a lot on my plate soon, but I plan to get moving after that.
  • It looks like changes are coming, and I might get what I want without having to do anything, so I'm waiting.
  • Somebody needed my help and I had to give her (him) all my attention.
  • To make progress, I'd have to give up what I'm doing, and since I like what I'm doing OK, it seems too risky.
  • Somebody I respect advised me to give it up.
  • Somebody I don't respect advised me to give it up, but since even an idiot can be right once in a while, I gave it up.
  • I noticed that someone else is much further along, and it seemed like I would probably lose out, so I gave up.
  • I can see how to get
    something like what
    I want, but it isn't
    exactly right, so I'm waiting
    It looked like there would be a big obstacle a few months (years) down the road, so I'm waiting to see if I can find a way around.
  • I heard there would be a better opportunity someday, so I decided to wait.
  • It does look good, but there are some serious problems with it, so I'm going slow.
  • They told me it was a done deal, and I had a lock on it, so I waited for the announcement, and then it went to someone else. Now I'm just disgusted.
  • If I go for it and I fail, I'll lose credibility and then I'll never be able to get what I want ever again.

Maybe now would be a good time to see what your own personal list looks like. Or maybe you can do it later. Go to top Top  Next issue: When Fear Takes Hold  Next Issue

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