Point Lookout: a free weekly publication of Chaco Canyon Consulting
Volume 20, Issue 14;   April 1, 2020: Virtual Meetings: Then and Now

Virtual Meetings: Then and Now

by

Now that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to stay-at-home orders that affect many of us, more of our meetings are virtual, and the virtual meetings we used to conduct are somewhat changed. How have they changed, and what can we do about it?
A bedroom in a log home

A bedroom in a log home. Not the ideal background for a videoconference. Check your background when you participate in videoconferences from home. Choose a location that's at least somewhat businesslike.

Many of us had become accustomed to virtual meetings, even before the COVID-19 pandemic led to widespread stay-at-home orders. But virtual meetings are happening much more frequently now during this pandemic. And there are some new twists, because these virtual meetings are unlike the virtual meetings we're accustomed to. So perhaps a review of the differences might be useful even to those who are familiar with the pre-pandemic virtual meeting format. Understanding the differences between pre-pandemic virtual meetings and virtual meetings now can help make our virtual meetings more effective.

We're now 100% virtual
Before the COVID-19 pandemic, many teams were able to conduct face-to-face meetings, a format known to be far more effective than virtual meetings when humans are involved. And many members of those teams that had mostly virtual meetings before the pandemic were also able to hold some face-to-face conversations with people with whom they were co-located. So before the pandemic there were virtual meetings, but there were also face-to-face meetings, hallway conversations, and lunches and coffee breaks.
Because of the stay-at-home orders, we can no Understanding the differences
between pre-pandemic virtual
meetings and virtual meetings
now can help make our
virtual meetings more effective
longer rely on face-to-face conversations to supplement our virtual meetings. Whatever puzzles do get sorted out now, get sorted out over telephone calls or videoconferences.
To mitigate the effects of this change, team members can try to meet more regularly — if virtually — in pairs and small groups.
One person, one mic/camera
Before the COVID-19 pandemic, many virtual team meetings consisted of small groups of co-located team members gathering around a single speakerphone or mic/camera to exchange ideas with other sites. Some of those other sites also consisted of small groups. Now, we're (nearly) all working from home — one person, one mic/camera.
When we had small subgroups interconnected through a virtual meeting, the members of the subgroups could converse face-to-face during the meeting. The members of the subgroups could comment to each other, or pass notes, or communicate by body language or by mouthing words. Although these interactions could be distractions, and often were frowned upon, they sometimes made the larger virtual meeting more effective. Now, all conversation usually occurs through the single channel of the virtual meeting. More of the confusions, misstatements, and unworkable ideas go through that channel before they can be sorted out.
To mitigate the effects of this change, use the chat feature of the conferencing software the team is using, if available. If that feature isn't available, try texting.
The home scene isn't the office scene
Attending a videoconference from home is a bit different from attending a videoconference from the office. The two settings differ in every way from background to lighting. In the office, the background of the shot is office furniture, computers, books — very businesslike. In the home the background of the shot could be anything from a kitchen refrigerator to a wall of family photos. Not so businesslike. And the lighting in the office is usually video-friendly. It's bright enough to make for a clear image of the videoconference participant. Lighting at home is usually subtler. Many participants appear in poorly lit silhouette.
Check to ensure that you're projecting the image you want to project. An easy way to check your image is to connect to an expired meeting using whatever meeting software you normally use. If there isn't anyone else in the meeting, the meeting software will probably show you what you look like. (This works for Skype, Microsoft Teams, and Zoom) Another approach is to connect to a meeting with yourself using a second device. It's a little more complicated to use a second device, but usually it's doable.
Whiteboard withdrawal
Especially for complex or technical issues, whiteboards are helpful communication tools. They're most effective when two or three people are working through some kind of puzzle, each person with a marker or two in hand, and everyone standing in front of the same whiteboard. Although there are tools that enable this kind of exchange in the virtual environment, it's difficult to replicate the natural flow and excitement of such face-to-face exchanges.
Most conferencing systems do include whiteboard capabilities, but if your team isn't satisfied with what you have, shop around. Search for online whiteboards. Don't assume that you must decide on a single system for everyone to use. Personal tastes and usage patterns differ.

There are many more differences between virtual meetings then and now, including the wide gulf between home printers and office printers. All these differences affect the flow and effectiveness of the new virtual meeting. Pay attention to what works and what doesn't, and be open to making adjustments. Go to top Top  Next issue: The New Virtual Meeting: Digressions  Next Issue

101 Tips for Effective MeetingsDo you spend your days scurrying from meeting to meeting? Do you ever wonder if all these meetings are really necessary? (They aren't) Or whether there isn't some better way to get this work done? (There is) Read 101 Tips for Effective Meetings to learn how to make meetings much more productive and less stressful — and a lot more rare. Order Now!

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Related articles

More articles on Effective Meetings:

The Thinker PowerPointingThink Before You PowerPoint
Microsoft PowerPoint is a useful tool. Many of us use it daily to create presentations that guide meetings or focus discussions. Like all tools, it can be abused — it can be a substitute for constructive dialog, and even for thought. What can we do about PowerPoint abuse?
Albert Einstein playing his violin on his 50th birthday in 1929The Perils of Piecemeal Analysis: Content
A team member proposes a solution to the latest show-stopping near-disaster. After extended discussion, the team decides whether or not to pursue the idea. It's a costly approach, because too often it leads us to reject unnecessarily some perfectly sound proposals, and to accept others we shouldn't have.
The mushroom cloud from the Grable test of 1953Misleading Vividness
Group decision making usually entails discussion. When contributions to that discussion include vivid examples, illustrations, or stories, the group can be at risk of making a mistaken decision.
Barack Obama, 44th President of the United StatesSpeak for Influence
Among the factors that determine the influence of contributions in meetings are the content of the contribution and how it fits into the conversation. Most of the time, we focus too much on content and not enough on fit.
A meeting that's probably a bit too largeA Pain Scale for Meetings
Most meetings could be shorter, less frequent, and more productive than they are. Part of the problem is that we don't realize how much we do to get in our own way. If we track the incidents of dysfunctional activity, we can use the data to spot trends and take corrective action.

See also Effective Meetings and Virtual and Global Teams for more related articles.

Forthcoming issues of Point Lookout

Two bull elk sparring in Grand Teton National Park, WyomingComing February 8: Kerfuffles That Seem Like Something More
Much of what we regard as political conflict is a series of squabbles commonly called kerfuffles. They captivate us while they're underway, but after a month or two they're forgotten. Why do they happen? Why do they persist? Available here and by RSS on February 8.
Stained Glass of William of Ockham in a church in Surrey, England, United KingdomAnd on February 15: Four Razors for Organizational Behavior
Deviant organizational behavior can harm the people and the organization. In choosing responses, we consider what drives the perpetrators. Considering Malice, Incompetence, Ignorance, and Greed, we can devise four guidelines for making these choices. Available here and by RSS on February 15.

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